VPI's Approach to Product Design and Development

What is the driving force behind new product development? Is it a demanding need? Changes in consumer preference? Advances in technology? Increasing competition? Brand awareness growth? Whichever the driving force, a strategic and planned out approach to product design and development is imperative to the new product’s foundational success.

Before jumping in and starting work on a prototype for a new product, what should you consider doing?

Systems engineering tasks that must be conducted to ensure successful product design and development outcomes include designing the system’s architecture, developing a high-level system design, and fleshing out a detailed product requirements document. These activities enable thought processes about the product that may have been overlooked or not considered. Making high-level design decisions at the outset of the product development process is vital.

Below are the approach steps VPI takes for successful product design and development:

Innovation is Creativity with a Job to do.

System Architecture development tasks involve high-level design exercises to create the big picture of how the product will function and be used. Defining inputs and outputs, user interaction, use cases, major system components, objectives (form factor, fit, function, target bill of materials cost, power consumption, etc.), creating a system context diagram, external interfaces, and other high-level requirements need to be completed in this effort.Part 1 of VPI’s approach to Product Design and Development covers the first systems engineering activity, System Architecture. System Architecture development tasks involve high-level design exercises to create the big picture of how the product will function and be used. Defining inputs and outputs, user interaction, use cases, major system components, objectives (form factor, fit, function, target bill of materials cost, power consumption, etc.), creating a system context diagram, external interfaces, and other high-level requirements need to be completed in this effort.

Following System Architecture, System Design is the next step in VPI’s approach to product design and development. While System Design may seem similar to System Architecture, it actually covers some different objectives including capturing high-level designs in a system specification document. These high-level designs include electrical design, mechanical design, software/application design, firmware design, and design for manufacturability requirements.

The electrical design process involves research and selection of major system components including processors and logic components, power and control systems, interfaces between devices and humans, and communications for both wired and wireless connectivity. Mechanical design maps out how the product components come together and interact spatially and structurally with an efficient cost perspective. Industrial design is often part of the System Design portion of a project where the look and feel is designed as well as interaction with environments and people using the device. Software and/or application high-level designs are mapped out, again defining how users will act with the system. Firmware design or embedded system design provides input on what electrical components are used and what embedded system protocols will be used. Lastly, design for manufacturability evaluates how the product can be engineered in such a way that it can be manufactured in mass quantities with parts that are readily available.

System Design at VPI